This Is Why We Should All Love Bats

Reblogged from http://www.buzzfeed.com

Give them a chance, you guys. They just want to eat all the bugs and pollinate tequila plants.posted on October 23, 2013 at 1:13am EDT

Sara Bee

COMMUNITY MEMBER

Look at this bat. That’s a nice bat.

Look at this bat. That's a nice bat.

Nobody really likes these guys, though.

Nobody really likes these guys, though.

(Sorry, bat friends.)

Because people think bats are terrifying little sharp-toothed bundles of flying hate.

Because people think bats are terrifying little sharp-toothed bundles of flying hate.

And rabies.

But here’s the thing.

But here's the thing.

BATS ARE ADORABLE.

BATS ARE ADORABLE.

THEY JUST WANT TO BE LOVED.

THEY JUST WANT TO BE LOVED.

And give love in return.

And give love in return.

Poor, misunderstood bats. See this one?! It’s like a little hamster with wings! Oh my god!

Poor, misunderstood bats. See this one?! It's like a little hamster with wings! Oh my god!

And they’re big fans of watermelon!

And they're big fans of watermelon!

But wait. There’s more.

But wait. There's more.

Doesn’t this strangely kind of resemble…

Doesn't this strangely kind of resemble...

THIS?!?

THIS?!?

Answer: pretty much.

Answer: pretty much.

And not only are they the cutest. Oh, no. Bats are wonderfully useful creatures to have around.

And not only are they the cutest. Oh, no. Bats are wonderfully useful creatures to have around.

Someday, this guy will be able to eat 600 mosquitoes in an hour. This is a mosquito-killing MACHINE.

Someday, this guy will be able to eat 600 mosquitoes in an hour. This is a mosquito-killing MACHINE.

Say these people here.

(Don’t pretend like mosquitoes aren’t the worst.)

This Is Why We Should All Love Bats

And if it weren’t for bats, we might have fewer bananas, mangoes, almonds, peaches…

This Is Why We Should All Love Bats

and TEQUILA.

and TEQUILA.

These people say that bats pollinate a bunch of different plants and/or spread their seeds. Seed production of the agave plants used to make tequila drops to 1/3000th of normal without bats to pollinate them.

I mean, don’t get me wrong.

This Is Why We Should All Love Bats

THEY ARE THE NIGHT.

THEY ARE THE NIGHT.

But also friends.

This Is Why We Should All Love Bats

Squeaky-clean friends.

Squeaky-clean friends.

(Apparently, bats groom themselves like cats.)

Which makes it sort of less awful if one of them beelines it for your hair.

Which makes it sort of less awful if one of them beelines it for your hair.

The end.

This Is Why We Should All Love Bats

Gardening For Honey Bees – Wisteria

wisteria

One of the best things you can plant for bees and other pollinators is wisteria. It doesn’t hurt that it is incredibly beautiful either.

How To Tell What Flowers Bees Will Like

Post image for Bees’ Favorite Colors are Blue and Yellow

Even if you don’t want to get a hive this year, you can still help the bees by planting flowers that they like.

It’s easy to tell for yourself which flowers will attract bees. There are three things to look for if you’re trying to woo a bee.

Look for Honey Spots

Do you see the little dots in the interior of the foxglove flower pictured above, on the left? Those are called “honey spots,” and for good reason. They act as a landing guide for bees. Now that you’re aware of what they are, you’ll start noticing them on all sorts of flowers. The mahogany colored ring around the center of the coreopsis on the top right is also a type of honey spot. It acts as a giant bull’s eye for the bee, telling it right where to go.

Go for the Blue and Yellow

No, bees aren’t University of Michigan fans. They just seem to be particularly attracted to blue and yellow flowers. Of course, bees do go to other colors of flowers, but just as hummingbirds really like red flowers, bees really like yellow and blue flowers.

Find the Landing Pad

Flowers that have evolved with bees have somewhere for bees to land. Teeny tiny flowers that are not in a cluster of other teeny-tiny flowers are either pollinated by some method other than bees, or have been hybridized by people and are not suitable for bees anymore. Same thing with long, tubular, extremely narrow flowers. Not suitable for bees.

Bees and flowers have a symbiotic relationship, so bees want to go to the flowers that want bees. And flowers that want bees put out a welcome mat in the form of a landing pad. In fact, members of the pea family have their flower petals ever so slightly glued together, creating the perfect place for bees to land. And when they do, the petals separate, dabbing the bee’s tummy with pollen. Then, when the bee lands on a female pea flower, the pollen receptor (stigma) is in the exact right place to brush against the part of the bee’s tummy with the pollen on it!